Posted on November 15, 2017

What if there were an App that connects to QBO and facilitates better cash flow, lower DSO, create fewer Bad Debts and saves you a ton of time? Would you be excited and eager to learn about it? That App does exist; it’s InvoiceSherpa. The following video shows you how QBO and InvoiceSherpa work together to improve each other and accomplish those crucial cash flow objectives.

In this video you will learn:

  • How to create thank you letters and reminders for your customers
  • How to automate recurring payments
  • How to invoice customers for late fees based on rules you customize for your business or individual clients
  • How to create and automate payment plans
  • How to create payment portals for your customers

We live in a technology-rich environment with Artificial Intelligence taking over more and more of our data entry tasks. Savvy business owners and their trusted advisors are automating as much as they can. That doesn’t mean you let the App take control. You still decide how often it deploys, what your terms will be, the language in your emails to your customers, and much more. But there is no need to do the same manual tasks over and over. Set it up once, let it fly and watch your cash flow increase!

Accounts Receivable automation can reduce your past due accounts. It can decrease your Days Sales Outstanding. It can lower your Bad Debt write-offs. Who doesn’t want to accomplish all of that? It’s money in the bank!

One of the services I offer to my clients is helping them collect Accounts Receivable more quickly. I use InvoiceSherpa to facilitate that. With its proven record of collecting outstanding receivables fifty per cent faster, InvoiceSherpa makes me look like a Rock Star to my clients!
Like peanut butter and jelly, like Sherlock and Watson, QBO and InvoiceSherpa are better together. Want to get your money into your bank account more quickly? Watch the following video to see how it works.

 

The above post was provided by Susan Pruskin, a Top 100 ProAdvisor for four straight years.
Susan Pruskin